The Seville Cathedral was built between 1402 and 1506, a relatively short amount of time in the Medieval age. The Seville cathedral dominates Seville like no other building.  The cathedral was added in 1987 by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, along with the adjoining Alcázar palace complex and the General Archive of the Indies. Seville Cathedral was built to demonstrate the city’s wealth, as it had become a major trading centre in the years after the Reconquista in 1248. In July 1401, city leaders decided to build a new cathedral to replace the grand mosque that served as the cathedral until then. Seville at one stage was the home base of the new world explorers. Everything brought back from the new world passed through Seville.

The outside of Seville Cathedral in Spain. The Cathedral sits in the centre of town

Seville Cathedral is the largest cathedral in the world

One of the doorways at the Seville Cathedral. It is decorated with a scene from the bible above the door leading up to more decorative details all the way to the top

Seville Cathedral is the 3rd largest Church in the world

The entrance to the Seville Cathedral. One section has just been cleaned so it is a nice white whereas the rest of the cathedral a sandy colour. There is a statue out the front of a woman with a palm and a sword

The Cathedral was built on the site of a grand Almohad Mosque. Seville’s cathedral was built to demonstrate the city’s power and wealth after the Moors were driven out and the Christian Kings were returned to power.

A gold altar inside the Seville Cathedral. It is very detailed and there are only some small sections that are not covered in gold.

The building is 135 meters (443 feet) long and 100 meters (328 feet) wide, and a ceiling height of 42 meters (138 feet).

Another personal altar in the Seville Cathedral. This one contains a statue of Mary and Child. The gold embellishments around it are stunning and look very delicate.

The Cathedral’s total area covers 11,520 square meters

Seville Cathedral

Two parts of the mosque were preserved in the cathedral. The Moorish entrance court and the Giralda Tower

A view of the roof and the beautiful arches within Seville Cathedral. The light coming in from the windows casts light all over the cathedral and highlights some of the beautiful carvings high up on the top of the arches

The tomb of Christopher Columbus lies inside the cathedral. The tomb is elevated off the ground as Columbus once stated: “over his dead body would he be buried in Spain”. Columbus had a falling out with the Spanish royalty. Where is Christopher Columbus buried is an ongoing question. You see its claimed some of Christopher Columbus is buried in Columbus Lighthouse at Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic as well. Columbus was moved at least 3 times after his death.

Three pictures of different angles of Christopher Columbus' tomb within Seville Cathedral. Four large statues of men hold a tomb above the ground

The Seville Cathedral complex houses 80 chapels. The Capilla Mayor, or Main Chapel, features what is said to be the largest altar in the world

The intricate ceiling of Seville Cathedral. The carvings go from the ground all the way up the huge columns to the ceiling. The light is coming through the stained glass windows

An inner courtyard is filled with Orange tree’s of which there are some 25,000 orange trees throughout the city.

A view through the orange trees towards the Giralda Tower within the Seville Cathedral grounds.

Seville Cathedral has fifteen doors on its four facades. These doors include:

  • The Door of Baptism, on the left side, was built in the 15th century. This door was decorated with a scene depicting the baptism of Jesus
  • The Door of Saint Michael or Door of the Nativity has sculptures representing the birth of Jesus
  • The Door of the Conception built in the late 18th century, (Puerta de la Concepción) opens onto the Court of the Oranges (Patio de los Naranjos). The door is only opened on festival days.
  • The Door of the Lizard (Puerta del Lagarto) leads from the Court of the Oranges. It is aptly named this as stuffed crocodile hanging from the ceiling.
  • The door of the Bells (Puerta de las Campanillas) so named because at the time of its construction the bells to call the workers were rung there.
Where did we stay in Seville

We stayed at Reservaloen Plaza del Salvador in the Seville Old Town. The apartments offer premium amenities, such as a coffee maker. Each apartment has an in-room dining area, a refrigerator and a private bathroom with a shower. We found the apartments to be roomy and well furnished. Very comfortable to relax after a day exploring. Restaurants straight out the front door made dining very easy

For more information and latest prices click here!

For more Seville, accommodation options search here!

 

The Giralda Tower

The Giralda tower was built in 1184-1196. It was originally used as a call to prayer. In Spanish its called La Giralda de Sevilla

Looking up at Giralda tower as it heads towards the sky through the orange trees. Seville Cathedral's arches rising up towards the tower as well

The Giralda is the bell tower of the Cathedral of Seville Spain. Its height is 343 feet (105 m)

A beautiful picture of the Seville Cathedral from half way up the Giralda Tower. The arches go from a sandy colour to a black right at the tips. You can see the courtyard of orange trees a little bit on the bottom left of the picture

There are no stairs in La Giralda de Sevilla. Instead, there is a series of 35 gently inclined ramps that are wide enough to allow two guards on horseback to pass.

A view of the city from the top of Giralda tower from Seville Cathedral. The storm clouds coming in take some of the shine off the red roofs

For all your Seville Cathedral tickets. book now and arrive ticket in hand ready to see one of the most amazing cathedrals in the world. Booking Seville Cathedral tickets mean no waiting in line to purchase tickets. A free audio guide is available with your Seville cathedral tickets. No visit to Seville is complete without visiting the Cathedral. Add it to your Seville itinerary today.

One last look at the Giralda tower from the exit gateway ofSeville Cathedral

Seville Cathedral Hours

Monday, from 11:00 am to 3:30 pm (from 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm, the visit with audioguide will be free. In Spanish and English).

Tuesday to Saturday, from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm. Seville Cathedral Hours on a Sunday is from 2:30 pm to 6:00 pm.


How to get to Seville

  • Find your international flights to Seville with Momondo. Domestic budget flights in Spain try Veuling
  • San Pablo Airport is located in the south of Spain, ten kilometres north-east of the Seville city centre.
  • Pick up your hire car from Seville Airport to explore the region. For the best prices click HERE.
  • Airport transfers to Seville and surrounding area are available. Book your transfer today.
  • Catch a train to Seville from cities in Spain and beyond. Plan your trip HERE
  • Many buses arrive and depart Seville Bus Station daily from all over Spain and Portugal. We arrived from Granada and departed to Albufeira Portugal from Seville Bus station. Search Bus tickets with Go Euro

Getting around Seville:

Seville’s bus system runs from  06:00 to 23:30. Perhaps the most convenient lines are the circular C1, C2, C3 & C4 lines, which take you near some of the Seville’s most iconic monuments. A single bus ticket costs 1,40€ or a Bonobus voucher allowing 10 trips costs 6€. Seville has a small metro with just three lines The Seville metro runs from 06:30 to 23:00 and until 02:00 on Friday and Saturdays. A single ticket costs 1,40€ or a one day ticket including unlimited travel on the Metro is 4,50€. The centre of Seville is very compact and easily traversed on foot. Other options include the Seville Card. The Seville Card allows you use public transport and offers free and discounted entry in too many Seville Attractions. The Seville Hop on Hop off bus offers 24 and 48-hour tickets. This bus drops off and picks up at 12 different spots around Seville and also offers 4 free walking tours. Get the latest prices and booking details HERE

Where to stay in Seville:

Seville has accommodation options for every budget from Hostels, to Apartments and Hotels rooms.
Hostels in Seville can start from as little as $14 a night for a shared dorm room. HostelClub has a great selection of properties. Check out Trip Advisor for the top 5 ranked hostels in Seville. You can book your stay directly from this page.
You can search Airbnb for there Seville accommodation offerings. If you have never used Airbnb before get yourself $50 credit by signing up and booking a stay right HERE
Hotels in Seville generally start from around $70 a night for a double room and increase incrementally as the luxury rating rises towards 5 stars.  You can compare and book your stay on Agoda, Hotels.com Hotels Combined and Priceline
(All coloured text in the Getting to Seville, Getting around Seville and Where to stay in Seville links to the pages mentioned for your information and booking convenience. We here at Wyld Family Travel will make a small commission from any bookings you make. This money goes into maintaining our website)

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